Posted 2 hours ago
Posted 6 hours ago

experiment: reblog this if you believe dean winchester is bisexual

jaredpadaleckicumstomatosauce:

angelofsexappeal:

somepretty-things:

destielthingsandstuff:

ssjdebusk:

ohitscastiel:

ohmymckirk:

ask-sollux-the-gemini:

I believe

there is no fucking way that boy is 100% straight

image

Oh are we doing the gif thing

image

image

image

image

*drops mic*

As straight as my hair in humidity
Dean why are you looking at me like that?image

I definitely think he’s bi, for sure

image

#i don’t believe it #i fucking know it #it is fact #it is law

(Source: sastielecki)

Posted 2 days ago

taco-marco:

staff:

starting today all blogs without the following image will be deleted within 24 hours

image

i’m not even afraid of deletion. i just want this image on my blog

(Source: dddderrnsuree)

Posted 3 days ago

loki-waywardson:

ok but seriously my favourite prehistoric animal is definitely andrewsarchus
image

THEIR JAW WAS A METER LONG

image
LOOK AT THAT SIZE COMPARISON
image
BUT THAT’S NOT THE BEST BIT
image
YOU SEE THEIR CLOSEST LIVING RELATIVES AREN’T BEARS
image
OR WOLVES
image
NO
image
THEIR CLOSEST LIVING RELATIVES
imageARE SHEEP
image

(Source: urmotherwasahamster)

Posted 3 days ago
sixpenceee:

And here they are:
Thermoception:  Ability to sense heat and cold. Thermoceptors in the brain are used for monitoring internal body temperature.
Proprioception: The sense of where your body parts are located relevant to each other. 
Chronoception: Sense of the passing of time. Your body has an internal clock. 
Equilibrioception:  The sense that allows you to keep your balance and sense body movement in terms of acceleration and directional changes. 
Magentoception:  This is the ability to detect magnetic fields. Unlike most birds, humans do not have a strong magentoception, however, experiments have demonstrated that we do tend to have some sense of magnetic fields. 
Tension Sensors:  These are found in such places as your muscles and allow the brain the ability to monitor muscle tension.
Nociception:  In a word, pain.  This was once thought to simply be the result of overloading other senses, such as “touch”, but it has it’s own unique sensory system.  There are three distinct types of pain receptors: cutaneous (skin), somatic (bones and joints), and visceral (body organs).
SOURCE

sixpenceee:

And here they are:

Thermoception:  Ability to sense heat and cold. Thermoceptors in the brain are used for monitoring internal body temperature.

Proprioception: The sense of where your body parts are located relevant to each other. 

Chronoception: Sense of the passing of time. Your body has an internal clock. 

Equilibrioception:  The sense that allows you to keep your balance and sense body movement in terms of acceleration and directional changes. 

Magentoception:  This is the ability to detect magnetic fields. Unlike most birds, humans do not have a strong magentoception, however, experiments have demonstrated that we do tend to have some sense of magnetic fields. 

Tension Sensors:  These are found in such places as your muscles and allow the brain the ability to monitor muscle tension.

Nociception:  In a word, pain.  This was once thought to simply be the result of overloading other senses, such as “touch”, but it has it’s own unique sensory system.  There are three distinct types of pain receptors: cutaneous (skin), somatic (bones and joints), and visceral (body organs).

SOURCE

Posted 3 days ago
sixpenceee:

BEAST OF DARTMOOR AS SEEN ON FACT OR FAKED
This footage of a large black entity was released. It was as big as a lion. Ofcourse many jumped to the conclusion of this beast being a hellhound (a creature that if you look in the eye more than 3x, you will surely die) but the prime candidate is a melanistic mountain lion. 
VIDEO

Can’t be a mountain lion. They don’t have manes, nor do they run quite like that.

sixpenceee:

BEAST OF DARTMOOR AS SEEN ON FACT OR FAKED

This footage of a large black entity was released. It was as big as a lion. Ofcourse many jumped to the conclusion of this beast being a hellhound (a creature that if you look in the eye more than 3x, you will surely die) but the prime candidate is a melanistic mountain lion. 

VIDEO

Can’t be a mountain lion. They don’t have manes, nor do they run quite like that.

Posted 3 days ago

Reblog if you like tea.

sherloki-society:

hunterraiehorror:

miss-gelly:

failwolfhale:

Any kind. Hot. Cold. White. Green. Black. Rooibos. Herbal. Oolong. Sweet. Unsweet. With Milk. Without. Tea is great.

All tea

Tea is life.

image

Posted 4 days ago

pomskyri:

Gender Bent kill la kill!

Okay but imagine if the outfits still transformed into what they do in the actual show. I would love to see this.

Posted 4 days ago

sixpenceee:

Déjà Vu

Déjà vu is the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself.

The experience is usually accompanied by a strong sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness, strangeness, or weirdness. The “previous” experience is usually attributed to a dream, but sometimes there is a firm sense that it has truly occurred in the past.

Déjà Vécu

Déjà vécu is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu.

Déjà vu is the sense of having seen something before, whereas déjà vécu is the experience of having seen an event before, but in great detail – such as recognizing smells and sounds. 

Déjà Visité

Déjà visité is a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. For example, you may know your way around a a new town or a landscape despite having never been there, and knowing that it is impossible for you to have this knowledge. 

Déjà Senti

Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. This is exclusively a mental phenomenon and seldom remains in your memory afterwards.

You could think of it as the feeling of having just spoken, but realizing that you, in fact, didn’t utter a word.

Jamais Vu

Jamais vu (never seen) describes a familiar situation which is not recognized. It is often considered to be the opposite of déjà vu and it involves a sense of eeriness. The observer does not recognize the situation despite knowing rationally that they have been there before.

Chris Moulin, of Leeds University, asked 92 volunteers to write out “door” 30 times in 60 seconds. He reported that 68% of the precipitants showed symptoms of jamais vu, such as beginning to doubt that “door” was a real word. This has lead him to believe that jamais vu may be a symptom of brain fatigue.

Presque Vu

Presque vu is very similar to the “tip of the tongue” sensation – it is the strong feeling that you are about to experience an epiphany – though the epiphany seldom comes. 

L’esprit de l’Escalier

L’esprit de l’escalier (stairway wit) is the sense of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late. 

Capgras Delusion

Capgras delusion is the phenomenon in which a person believes that a close friend or family member has been replaced by an identical looking impostor. This could be tied in to the old belief that babies were stolen and replaced by changelings in medieval folklore, as well as the modern idea of aliens taking over the bodies of people on earth to live amongst us for reasons unknown. This delusion is most common in people with schizophrenia but it can occur in other disorders.

Fregoli Delusion

Fregoli delusion is a rare brain phenomenon in which a person holds the belief that different people are, in fact, the same person in a variety of disguises. It is often associated with paranoia and the belief that the person in disguise is trying to persecute them.

It was first reported in 1927 in the case study of a 27-year-old woman who believed she was being persecuted by two actors whom she often went to see at the theatre. She believed that these people “pursued her closely, taking the form of people she knows or meets”.

Prosopagnosia

Prosopagnosia is a phenomenon in which a person is unable to recognize faces of people or objects that they should know. People experiencing this disorder are usually able to use their other senses to recognize people – such as a person’s perfume, the shape or style of their hair, the sound of their voice, or even their gait. A classic case of this disorder was presented in the 1998 book (and later Opera by Michael Nyman) called “The man who mistook his wife for a hat”.

SOURCE

Posted 4 days ago

Please reblog if you think a blind person can cosplay.

the-ackerman-queen:

unzan:

I’ve been very self-conscious even though I never cosplayed, and I’m afraid that people will make fun of me if I show up at a convention with my cane, so please reblog if you wouldn’t mind?!

Of course they can! Blind folk can cosplay as anyone they want and can look just as kick-ass…